Advantages of Cloud Computing

Nowadays, it is clear that cloud computing has revolutionized how technology is obtained, used and managed. And all of this has changed how organizations budget and pay for technology services.

Cloud Computing has given us the ability to reconfigure quickly our environments to be able to adapt them to changing business requirements. We can run cost effective services that can scale up and down depending on usage or business demands and, all of this, using pay-per-use billing. Making unnecessary huge upfront infrastructure expenses for enterprises, and balancing the possibilities between been a big enterprise or a new one.

There are multiple and diverse advantages, and most of them depend on the enterprises, the business and the needs they have. But, there are six of them that tend to appear in every case:

Variable vs. Capital Expense

Instead of having to invest in data centers and servers before knowing how they are going to be used, they can be paid when you consume computing resources and paid only for how much you consume.

Economies of Scale

By, using cloud computing, we can achieve a lower variable costs that we would get on our own. Cloud providers like AWS can aggregate hundred of thousands of customers in the cloud, achieving higher economies of scale, which translates in lower prices.

Stop Guessing Capacity

When we make a capacity decision prior to deploying an application, we usually end up either setting expensive idle resources or dealing with limited capacity. With cloud computing there is no more need for guessing. The cloud allow us to access as much or as little as we need to cover our business needs and to scale up or down as required without advanced planning, with in minutes.

Increase Speed and Agility

Deploy new resources to cover new business cases or implementation of prototypes and POCs to experiment now can be achieved with a few clicks provisioning new resources in a simple, easy and fast way usually reducing costs and time and allowing companies to adapt or explore.

Focus on Business Differentiators

Cloud computing allows enterprises to focus on their business priorities, instead of on the heavy lifting of racking, stacking, and powering servers. This allows enterprises to focus on projects that differentiate their businesses.

Go Global in Minutes

With cloud computing enterprises can easily deploy their applications to multiple locations around the world. This allows to provide redundancy and lower latencies. This is not any more reserved just for the largest enterprises. Cloud computing has democratized this ability

Advertisements
Advantages of Cloud Computing

Microservices: Capability model

Microservices is an area that is still evolving. There is no standard or reference architecture for microservices. Some of the architectures available publicly nowadays are from vendors and, obviously, they try to promote their own tools stack.

But, even, do not having an specific standard or reference we can sketch out some guidelines to design and develop microservices.

Capability Model
Image 1. Capability Model (Seen in “Spring 5.0 Microservices – Second Edition)

As we can see, the capability model is main splitted in four different areas:

  • Core capabilities (per microservice).
  • Supporting capabilities.
  • Process and governance capabilities.
  • Infrastructure capabilities.

Core capabilities

Core capabilities are those components generally packaged inside a single microservice. In case of microservices and fat jars approach, everything will be inside the file we are generating.

Service listeners and libraries

This box is referring to the listener and libraries the microservice has in place to accept service requests. The can be HTTP listeners, message listeners or more. There is one exception though, if the microservice is in char only of scheduled tasks, maybe, it does not need listeners.

Storage capability

Microservices can have some king of storage to do properly their task, physical storages like MySQ, MongoDB or Elasticsearch, or in-memory storages, caches or in-memory data grids like Ehcache, Hazelcast or others. There are some different storages but, it does not matter what type of storage is used, this will be owned by the microservice.

Service implementation

This is were the business logic is implemented. It should follow tradicional design approaches like modularization and multi-layered. Different microservices can be implemented in different languages and, as a recommendation, they should be as stateless as possible.

Service endpoint

This box just refers to the external APIs offered by the microservice. Both included, asynchronous and synchronous, been possible to use technologies from REST/JSON to messaging.

Infrastructure capabilities

To deploy our application and for the application to work properly we need some infrastructure and infrastructure management capabilities.

Cloud

For obvious reason, microservice architectures fit more in cloud based environments that in tradicional data center environments. Things like scaling, cost effective management and the cost of the physical infrastructures and the operations make in multiple occasion a cloud solution more cost effective.

We can find different providers like AWS, Azure or IBM Bluemix.

Container runtime

There are multiple options here and, obviously, container solutions are not the only solutions. There are option like virtual machines but, from a resources point of view, the last ones consume more of them. In addition, usually it is much faster to start an instance of a new container than to start a new virtual machine.

Here, we can find technologies like Docker, Rocket and LXD.

Container orchestration

One of the challenges in the microservices world is that the number of instances, containers or virtual machines grows adding complexity, if not making it impossible, manual provisioning and deployments. Here is were containers orchestration tools like Kubernetes, Mesos or Marathon come quite handy, helping us to automatically deploy applications, adjust traffic flows and replicate instance among other.

Supporting capabilities

They are not related with the microservices world but they are essential for supporting large systems.

Service gateway

The service gateway help us with the routing, policy enforcement, a proxy for our services or composing multiple service endpoints. There are some options one of them is the Spring Cloud Zuul gateway.

Software defined load balancer

Our load balancers should be smart enough to be able to manage situations where new instances are added or removed, in general, when there are changes in the topology.

There are a few solutions, one of them is the combination of Ribbon, Eureka and Zuul in Spring Cloud Netflix. A second one can be Marathon Load Balancer.

Central log management

When the number of microservices grow in our system the different operations that before were in one server now are taking place in multiple server. All this servers produce logs and to have them in different machines make quite difficult to debug errors sometimes. For this reason, we should have a centrally-managed log repository. In addition, all the generated logs should have a correlation ID to be able to track an execution easily.

Service discovery

With the amount of services increasing the static service resolution is close to imposible. To support all the new addition, we need a service discovery that can deal with this situation in runtime. One option is Spring Cloud Eureka. A different one, more focus in container discovery is Mesos.

Security service

Monolithic applications were able to manage security themselves but, in a microservices ecosystem we need authentication and token services to allow all the communications flow in our ecosystem.

Spring offers a couple of solution like Spring OAuth or Spring Security, but any single sign-on solution should be good.

Service configuration

As we said int he previous article, configurations should be externalized. It is an interesting choice set in our environments and configuration server. Spring, again, provides Spring Cloud Config but there are some other alternatives.

Ops monitoring

There is need to remember that now, with all this new instances, all of them scaling up and down, environment changes, service dependencies and new deployments going on, one of the most important things it is to monitor our system.  Things like Spring Cloud Netflix Turbine or Hystrix dashboard provide service-level information. There are some other tools that provide end-to-end monitoring like AppDynamic or NewRelic.

Dependency management

It is recommended the use of some dependency management visualization tools to be aware of the system complexity. They will help us to check dependencies among services and to take appropriate design decisions.

Data lake

As we have said before, each microservice should have each own data storage and this should not be shared between different microservices. From a design point of view, this is a great solution but, sometimes, organizations need to create reports or they have some business process that use data from different services. To avoid unnecessary dependencies we can set a data lake. They are like data warehouses where to store raw data without any assumption about how the information is going to be use. In this way, any service that needs information about another service, just needs to go to the data lake to find the data.

On of the things we need to consider in this approach is that we ned to propagate the changes to the data lake to maintain the information in synch, some tools that can help us with this is Spring Cloud Data Flow or Kafka.

Reliable messaging

We want to maximize the decoupling among microservices. The way to do this is to develop them as much reactive as possible. For this reliable messaging system are needed. Tools like RabbitMQ, ActiveMQ or Kafka are good for this purpose.

Process and governance capabilities

Basically, how we put everything together and we survive. We need some processes, tool and guidelines around microservices implementations.

DevOps

One of the keys about using a microservice oriented architecture is been agile, quick deploys, builds, continuous integrations, testing… Here is where a DevOps culture come handy in opposite to the waterfall culture.

Automation tools

Continuous integration, continuous delivery, continuous deployments, test automation, all of them are needed or at least recommended in a microservices environment.

And again, testing, testing, testing. I cannot say how important in this, now that we have our system splitted in microservices the need to use mocking techniques to test, and to be completely confident, we need functional and integration tests.

Container registry

We are going to create containers, in the same way we need a repository to store the artifacts we build, we need a container registry to store our containers. There are some options like Docker Hub, Google Container Repository or Amazon EC2 container registry.

Microservice documentation

Microservices system are based on communication. Communication among microservices, calls to APIs offered by this microservices but, we need to ensure that people that want to use our available APIs can understand how to do it. For this reason is important to have a good API repository:

  • Expose repository via a web browser.
  • Provide easy ways to navigate APIs.
  • Well organized.
  • Possibility to invoke and test the endpoint with examples.

For all of this we can use tools like Swagger or RAML.

Reference architecture and libraries

In an ecosystem like this the need to set standard, reference models, best practices and guidelines on how to implement better microservices are even more important than before. All of this should live as a architecture blueprints, libraries, tools and techniques promoted and enforced by the organizations and the developer teams.

I hope that after this article, we start having a rough idea about how to tackle the implementation of our systems following a microservice approach. In addition, a few tools to start playing with.

Note: Article based on my notes about the book “Spring 5.0 Microservices – Second Edition”. Rajesh R. V

Microservices: Capability model